Author: Robert Jason Grant

The Play Therapy Room and The Sensory Different Child
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The Play Therapy Room and The Sensory Different Child

Children with sensory differences may start to become dysregulated when they enter the lobby or waiting room of a clinic. The lighting, the noise level, specific sounds, the odors, etc. could be extremely uncomfortable or painful for the child. Thus, before the child ever finds themselves in the play therapy room, they have already started…

Play Therapist: Your Neurodiversity Journey Matters
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Play Therapist: Your Neurodiversity Journey Matters

When I began (around 22 years ago) compiling the protocol/integration for AutPlay® Therapy, I had an understanding of neurodiversity. I had read about the term and concept from Judy Singer and had my own lived experience as a neurodivergent person. I also had an awareness and understating of ableism, primarily pertaining to individuals with physical…

Play Therapy and the Neurodivergent Child: A Parent’s Guide
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Play Therapy and the Neurodivergent Child: A Parent’s Guide

Play is the natural language of all children regardless of diagnosis, disability, or developmental issue. It is the most organic process for children to express troubling thoughts and feelings that are both conscious and unconscious. Play makes learning an enjoyable and engaging experience and provides the best method to impart information needed by children to…

Play therapists and the terminology of autism
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Play therapists and the terminology of autism

When discussing autism, terminology is significant, and much has been discussed about the use of identity vs person first language when referencing autism. An example of identity first language would be “autistic child” or autistic individuals.” An example of person first language would be “child with autism” or “individuals with autism.” A basic inquiry in…

AutPlay® Therapy and the Virtual Sandtray App (VSA)
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AutPlay® Therapy and the Virtual Sandtray App (VSA)

Research supports that autistic individuals are often drawn to technology more so than their neurotypical peers (Goldsmith & LeBlanc, 2004), and incorporating technology-based interventions (especially those that have shown promise in addressing the needs of neurodivergent clients), becomes a logical therapy process. The increasing popularity, affordability, accessibility, and availability of technology devices have influenced research…